Add an extra hard drive (with pictures)

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Add an extra hard drive (with pictures)
Add an extra hard drive (with pictures)
Anonim

Do you need more storage space on your computer? This article shows you a few simple steps to help you add a new hard drive and more storage space to your computer.

Steps

Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 1

Step 1. Find out if you have the IDE (parallel ATA) or Need Serial ATA.

Older computers support IDE (Parallel ATA) and newer ones may only work with Serial ATA. Open the computer if you are not sure and try to determine by sight what type of hard drive is present. It is best to use the same kind that has already been used, even if the connections for a different kind also seem to be there.

  • IDE drives use a wide, flat ribbon cable and may have jumpers that you must set.
  • SATA drives have a thinner cable and you don't have to worry about jumpers.
Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 2

Step 2. Find out if there is room for an extra hard drive

You can do this as follows:

  1. Restart your computer and go to the BIOS menu.
  2. Go to the 'Standard CMOS Settings Or IDE Config'.
  3. This menu contains four settings, labeled as follows: PRIMARY MASTER:, AUTO/PRIMARY SLAVE:, SECONDARY MASTER:, SECONDARY SLAVE:. Set them all to 'auto detection'.
  4. Restart your computer

    Step 3. Locate where all the flat ribbon cables (or SATA cables, smaller and usually red) connect to the motherboard

    (Fig. 3) Locate the cable going to the free drive detected in steps 1-6, either 'primary' or 'secondary'.

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 3

    Step 4. Buy a hard drive

    Visit your nearest computer store or buy one online. Make sure that the type (SATA or IDE (PATA)) is the correct one. If you want to replace an existing hard drive (see the warning about replacing hard drives), make sure you buy one with enough space to make up for what you lose in storage space.

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 4

    Step 5. Shut down your computer

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 5

    Step 6. Unplug all cables from the back of the computer and remove the computer from your desk

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 6

    Step 7. Remove the screws from the housing

    If you have a Dell, all you have to do is push the buttons on the side or back. If it doesn't work, look up how to remove the case in your computer's user manual. Put the screws in a safe place so you don't lose them. Remove the side panel and set it aside.

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 7

    Step 8. Locate where all the flat ribbon cables (or SATA cables, smaller and usually red) connect to the motherboard

    (Fig. 3) Locate the cable going to the free drive detected in steps 1-6, either 'primary' or 'secondary'.

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 8

    Step 9. Set the jumpers so the drive knows whether to run as master or slave (IDE only)

    The jumpers are the pins on the back of the hard drive. There are a few rubber or plastic blocks over certain pins. Find the diagram or instructions that came with your new hard drive on how to set the jumpers as master or slave. If the location you are going to use (primary or secondary) is available as both master and slave, make sure that you set the hard drive as master. (Fig. 4) When using a SATA drive, be careful not to set the jumpers, as each SATA drive uses its own cable, while multiple IDE drives can be on the same cable.

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 9

    Step 10. Find an empty space for the hard drive in your computer

    Secure the hard drive with the supplied screws. (fig. 5)

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 10

    Step 11. Connect the cable you found in step 6 to the hard drive

    If he doesn't want to go in, see if the safety knob is on the right side (fig. 6)

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 11

    Step 12. Connect a Molex power cable, (a smaller cable with red, yellow and black wires)

    (Fig. 7) A SATA drive uses a different type of connecting cable to the power supply.

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 12

    Step 13. Replace the side panel and retighten the screws

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 13

    Step 14. Put all the cables back on the back and reconnect the power supply

    Add an Extra Hard Drive Step 14

    Step 15. Restart the computer

    Enter the BIOS during boot (usually by pressing F10 or DEL while the computer is booting). Check the 'auto detect' settings in the BIOS to make sure the second drive is seen. You should see the name of your new hard drive on the screen showing the primary master/slave, secondary master/slave.

    Tips

    • Go for SATA drives over IDE as they are generally faster than the wide ribbon cable of a DIE drive can get in the way of airflow in a computer.
    • If there is a problem in the BIOS, see if the original drive is set as 'Master'. If the original drive is set to CS (cable select), make sure it's on the end of the cable (make sure you have a cable select ribbon cable; each connector is labeled that way). Also make sure that you do not connect the cable upside down.
    • Try to leave some space between the discs to allow air to pass through and improve cooling.
    • If you have USB connections on your computer, you can also consider purchasing an external hard drive. You connect them directly to a USB input and they work like any other hard drive. You only have to take extra steps if you want to boot from it.
    • SATA drives work more or less the same. Read the user manual to install them. Note that they only work with motherboards with SATA connections.

    Warnings

    • This guide is not intended for Macintosh computers.
    • Don't change any of the CMOS settings. Each setting changes how your computer works and you can shut down your computer without realizing it.
    • Although it is not impossible in itself to replace the hard drive that contains the operating system (the C: drive), it is a complicated job. Do not use these instructions to replace a system disk. You can replace data discs without any problems. Note that you may need to temporarily leave the old drive in order to transfer your data to the new drive. If this is not possible (because, for example, all connections have already been used), you will need a USB to IDE adapter or a USB to SATA adapter to transfer your files.
    • Most hard drives are sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESO). Make sure you're grounded when doing this job (or, really, any job involving electronics). If that's not possible, at least don't walk barefoot on a carpet or something just before you start. Touch your hard drive as little as possible. Pick it up and put it in there. Don't play with it.

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