View active network connections

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View active network connections
View active network connections
Anonim

Sometimes it is necessary to check the current network connection in Windows. There are a few easy methods to do this. From Windows 7, go to the Network and Sharing Center section. For all other users, there is the 'netstat' or network statistics, a command window tool that can be used to spot problems or find out how much network traffic there is. Fortunately, this command can be done in just a few simple steps.

Steps

Method 1 of 4: Using the Network and Sharing Center in Windows 7 to 10

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 1

Step 1. Click on Start

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 2

Step #2. Go to Settings

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 3

Step 3. Select Ethernet

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 4

Step 4. Go to the Network and Sharing Center

The Network and Sharing Center is a feature of Windows 7-10 that allows you to view the status of your network, the type of connection you have, whether you can connect to computers other than your own, and whether you are connected to your own network or with the internet.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 5

Step 5. Click on the icon next to 'Connections'

This must match the type of your connection; For example, 'Ethernet' will be represented by the plug of an Ethernet cable, and a wireless network connection will be represented by five bars.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 6

Step 6. Click on details

A window will appear with details about your network connection.

Method 2 of 4: Using the Network Connections folder in Windows 7

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 7

Step #1. Open the Start menu

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 8

Step 2. Search 'ncpa.cpl' (without the quotes) in the search field

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 9

Step 3. Wait for the Network Connections folder to appear

Here you can see all available connections in your network.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 10

Step 4. Right click on the desired connection

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 11

Step 5. Select Status from the drop-down menu

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 12

Step 6. Wait for the Network Status page to display

Here you can check the status of the network. Click Details for more information.

Method 3 of 4: Using the netstat command in Vista or later

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 13

Step #1. Go to the Start menu

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 14

Step 2. Search for 'cmd'

Type 'cmd' without quotes in the search field to open the command window.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 15

Step 3. Wait for a black window, or terminal, to appear

Here you will type the command netstat. There are a few different options you can use and some of the more popular ones are listed below.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 16

Step 4. Type netstat -a to view the current connections

This command will give you a list of your current TCP or Transmission Control Protocol connections and ports, with the physical computer name for local addresses and the host name for remote addresses. It will also state the status of the port (waiting, established, etc…)

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 17

Step 5. Type netstat -b to see which programs are using which connections

This command will display the same list as netstat -a, but it will also show you which programs are using which connectors/ports.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 18

Step 6. Type netstat -n to display IP addresses

This command shows the same list of TCP connections and ports, but with numeric IP addresses instead of the names of the computers or services.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 19

Step 7. Type netstat /? to display the different commands available

This command will give you the statistics for all variations of the netstat protocols.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 20

Step 8. Check the active network connections

Once you enter the netstat command, a list of TCP/UCP connections with IP addresses will appear.

Method 4 of 4: Using the netstat command in XP

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 21

Step 1. Press Start

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 22

Step 2. Click on 'Run

' A text field appears.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 23

Step 3. Type 'cmd' without the quotes

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 24

Step 4. Wait for a black window, or terminal, to appear

Here you will type the command netstat. There are a few different options you can use and some of the more popular ones are listed below.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 25

Step 5. Type netstat -a to view current connections

This command will give you a list of your current TCP or Transmission Control Protocol connections and ports, with the physical computer name for local addresses and the host name for remote addresses. It will also state the status of the port (waiting, established, etc…)

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 26

Step 6. Type netstat -b to see which programs are using which connections

This command will display the same list as netstat -a, but it will also show you which programs are using which connectors/ports.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 27

Step 7. Type netstat -n to display IP addresses

This command shows the same list of TCP connections and ports, but with numeric IP addresses instead of the names of the computers or services.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 28

Step 8. Type netstat /? to display the different commands available

This command will give you the statistics for all variations of the netstat protocols.

See Active Network Connections (Windows) Step 29

Step 9. Check the active network connections

Once you enter the netstat command, a list of TCP/UCP connections and IP addresses will appear.

Tips

  • You can also download TCPView from SysInternals
  • Experiment - there are many UNIX commands available (like the 'netstat' mentioned above) - use your favorite search engine to look them up.
  • It should be noted that the netstat command is deprecated in Linux. Use 'ip –s, 'ss' or 'ip route' instead.

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